Categories
Arts & Culture At Home Food & Drink Staycation

Got Yeast? Then Take a Trip Around the World Through Bread

Based on the pictures of store shelves emptied of yeast and flour, it seems staying home means more people than ever are learning how to bake bread. Why not take that new found skill on a world tour with these recipes?

Bagels

Let’s start our journey in NYC. Every time I visit New York City, bagels are a must (at least once, but usually most mornings). My favorite bagel shop in Manhattan is Bagel & Schmear in Midtown. It’s just a short walk to Madison Square Park, where I like have a bagel picnic and gaze at my favorite building in the city, the Flatiron. Outside of New York, it’s pretty hard, if not impossible, to find a truly great bagel. Fortunately, it’s easy to make great bagels at home. I like this King Arthur Flour recipe. I took a bagel making class at the King Arthur Flour headquarters and learned one key trick: Let your shaped bagels rest in the fridge overnight, on a sheet pan and under plastic wrap. The extra fermentation in the fridge creates an extra-chewy crust and gives the bagels more flavor.

Pão de Queijo

I’ve never been to Brazil, but I sure do love Brazilian cheese bread, Pão de Queijo. This recipe requires no yeast and is gluten-free thanks to a surprising ingredient, tapioca flour, which takes the place of wheat flour. Cheese is the star of the show, however, and the end result is a crispy, gooey cross between a dinner roll and mozzarella stick. These don’t require yeast. The process to make Pão de Queijo is similar to pâte à choux (cream puff dough.) These are best eaten a little warm and in large quantities (you won’t be able to stop yourself!) Check out this YouTube video to better understand the methodology behind this recipe. Since I will always stan for King Arthur Flour, here’s their recipe.

Stollen

Stollen is technically a Christmastime recipe, but, at the moment, time seems more like an abstract idea than a practical matter so go ahead and treat yourself to a virtual trip to Germany through this sweet yeast bread. It’s studded with lots of dried fruit and a tunnel of marzipan. I’m a marzipan freak, and add more marzipan than recipes usually call for; but I hate raisins so I never use them (insert your favorite dried fruit instead). Your kids will love the heavy dusting of powdered sugar that coats this loaf like a blanket of fresh snow. Here’s a tried and true recipe from the folks at Serious Eats.

Focaccia

The moment I saw Samin Nosrat making this focaccia on her drool-inducing Netflix series SALT FAT ACID HEAT, I knew I needed to whip up a batch of this bread from the Ligurian region in Northern Italy. I was right; this is a must-make recipe. This focaccia recipe is pillowy, crispy in the right spots, made with good extra virgin olive oil, and, surprisingly, with a salty brine that balances salt and fat so perfectly. This recipe is easy, but will need a solid 12 to 14 hours of (hands-off) time for the first rise, which is perfect for staying home in quarantine. Pro-tip: This freezes up extremely well. Cut into rectangular portion sizes, stash it in your freezer, and you’ll have an awesome treat available (as long as it lasts, but, I say, keep baking and don’t let your stock run out).

Japanese Milk Bread

Japan was in my (now-canceled) travel plans for 2020, and as such I spent hours and hours watching YouTube videos about where and what to eat on my trip. Through my discovery process, I learned about Hokkaido Milk bread, a super-soft loaf of white bread and often used for making tonkatsu sandos (fried pork cutlet sandwiches). The bread gets its signature soft texture from incorporating a tangzhong into the dough. The flour-and-milk paste creates a supple, tender loaf that’s not at all similar to the old standbys on American grocery store shelves. I was supposed to leave for Japan on June 18; instead, I’ll bake up a loaf of milk bread and attempt my own rendition of a tonkatsu sando and at least I’ll save the 14-hour flight! King Arthur Flour has a wonderful recipe here.

Icelandic Rúgbrauð

Last summer, I spent 10 days road tripping through Iceland in a camper van. I can’t tell you how many times over the past month I’ve dreamt of running away to live out this pandemic in a van beside a waterfall. But that’s a fantasy best kept to my day dreams (Iceland doesn’t want me right now!). However, I am planning on finding time in my busy baking schedule to take on Rúgbrauð which is an Icelandic rye bread that’s traditionally baked in the ground through geothermal energy. Don’t have a lava field warming up your back yard? You can also get the same effect by a long bake in a relatively low oven. This is a great recipe to try if you can’t get your hands on yeast, as it’s a quick bread that uses baking soda as leavening (though you will need to get your hands on some rye flour). During my travels in Iceland, I couldn’t get enough of this dark, slightly sweet bread slathered with good Icelandic butter, so I’ll simply recreate a tiny bit of my fantasy at home and pretend I’m back in time in my cozy van fueling up for my next adventure. The Splendid Table has an authentic recipe here.

More from SmarterTravel

Categories
Food & Drink

Tel Aviv Street Food

The Tel Aviv food industry is truly the city’s heart and soul and while plenty of high-end eateries can be found throughout Tel Aviv, it is fresh local street food that has taken the city by storm.

Categories
Beach

The Eilat Dolphin Reef

The Dolphin Reef Eilat is a wildlife treasure on the shores of the Red Sea, where action-packed adventures go hand-in-hand with nature and relaxation. At the Reef, visitors enter a magical site, interacting with dolphins in their natural habitat; a stunning beach, where the plant-life is in full bloom and the view is breathtaking.

Categories
Adventure Travel Beach Cities

Eilat: Wet and Wild Adventure

Surrounded by water, Eilat, Israel’s most southern city, is a wet and wild adventure hub unlike anywhere else in the country. Eilat boasts top beaches, water sports, activities and attractions, open to the public year-round due to the warm local climate.

Categories
Arts & Culture Cities Historical Travel

Mamilla Avenue: A Walk of Art

In the seam between old and New Jerusalem, opposite the breathtaking view of the Old city walls and only few steps away from Jaffa Gate and the western wall, you'll find Alrov Mamilla Avenue. The modern open-air street mall, became popular with locals and tourists alike thanks to its proximity to the Old city and because it bring together the best of all worlds – Rich history, local culture, and sophisticated retail experience in a word-class prime location.

Categories
Arts & Culture Cities Outdoors

Haifa: Beauty that Inspires

With steep cliffs rolling down to the shore of the Mediterranean Sea and green hills overlooking the Haifa port, Israel's third largest city boasts some of the most picturesque views in the country.

Categories
Cities Historical Travel

The Old City of Jerusalem: A Magical City of Splendor

Visiting the Old City of Jerusalem is like travelling to a mystical, magical new world. Long considered one of the world’s holiest and most visited locations and home to structures and ruins significant to the three significant monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam, a walk through its hallowed passages is an exciting and life-changing source of historic, cultural and spiritual uplift that one simply must not miss out on.

Categories
Cities

Discover Beverly Hills, Los Angeles

Located in the heart of Los Angeles and world-renowned as the flagship scity of luxury and prestige, Beverly Hills is a wonder to visit. Stroll along famous, cobblestoned Rodeo Drive with its premier designer boutiques. Catcha photo opp in the Beverly Gardens Park and hop on the Beverly Hills Trolley Tour. Dine in five-star restaurants such as CUT, Spago ad Scarpetta before finishing off your night with a performance at the Wallis Annenberg Center for Performing Arts.

Find out more at http://www.discoverlosangeles.com/